Spring 2019 Seminar Series

Wednesday 6 February: Katherine Ibbett (Oxford), ‘Surface Writing: On the Seventeenth Century Saint Lawrence River’. 5pm, Silverstone 309 Wednesday 13 February: Emma Whipday (Newcastle), ‘“You see my sister’s yet at my dispose”: Brothers and Sisters on the Early Modern Stage’. 5pm, Silverstone 309 Monday 25 February: Work in progress: Flora Dennis, Nicole Mennell, Joanne Paul. …

Continue reading Spring 2019 Seminar Series

Advertisements

The Fool and the Law in Early Modern England

Readers of early modern literature are well acquainted with the fool type, a stock character that is frequently to be found in the drama of the period and is generally renowned for his merrymaking and, in some cases, wise witticism. And yet, because he was a ‘fool’ there must have been some points of contact …

Continue reading The Fool and the Law in Early Modern England

Zibellini as Animal-Made-Objects

This blog post was written by Sussex PhD student Nicole Mennell. Nicole's works explores the connections made between figures of sovereignty and animals in early modern drama. She has interned with the National Portrait Gallery where she conducted research for a future exhibition on pets. Nicole is also the co-founding editor of Brief Encounters, an open-access …

Continue reading Zibellini as Animal-Made-Objects

“Prosthesis in Medieval and Early Modern Culture” – a special issue of Textual Practice

Following the recent publication of a special issue of Textual Practice, “Prosthesis in Medieval and Early Modern Culture” , Katie Walter (co-editor of the special issue with Chloe Porter and Margaret Healy) talks us through the origins of the special issue and the conference that inspired it, and gives us a brief introduction into the fascinating …

Continue reading “Prosthesis in Medieval and Early Modern Culture” – a special issue of Textual Practice

“Plum pottage was mere popery”: the ups and downs of Christmas in the 17th century

Image from The Vindication of Christmas (Printed for G. Horton, London: 1652) Despite the persistent belief that Christmas was effectively invented by the Victorians and barely bothered with by anyone before the 19th century, a bit of a delve into the literature of the 17th century yields much in the way of interesting Christmas-related curiosities. Performance has a …

Continue reading “Plum pottage was mere popery”: the ups and downs of Christmas in the 17th century

The Life and Adventures of Meredith Hanmer, Anglican Divine

This blog post was written by Dr Angela Andreani, Marie Curie Intra-European Research Fellow in English at Sussex University. As her two year project investigating the "life and adventures" of Meredith Hanmer comes to a close, she shares some of the highlights of her research with us... St Mary's church, Youghal, where Hanmer was warden 1600-1602 The …

Continue reading The Life and Adventures of Meredith Hanmer, Anglican Divine

Andrew Hadfield at the Tudor and Stuart Ireland Conference

Sussex's own Professor Andrew Hadfield recently gave the closing plenary address at the 6th Annual Tudor & Stuart Ireland Interdisciplinary Conference at NUI Galway. The paper, entitled 'Edmund Spencer the Less among the Jacobites', is now available as a podcast and you can listen to it here: https://soundcloud.com/history-hub/andrew-hadfield-edmund-spencer-the-less-among-the-jacobites